EPISODE 105 | RELEASED January 25, 2021

Rare Plasmacytomas in Dogs │ Dr. Nancy Reese Q&A

Most plasmacytoma tumors are solitary, non-aggressive, pink growths on the surface of the skin that can be resolved using surgical removal — but what about the aggressive ones?

SHOW NOTES

In this week’s episode of Dog Cancer Answers, Dr. Nancy Reese discusses plasmacytoma tumors. She explains that most vets who find plasmacytoma tumors in their patients, will locate them as solitary, non-aggressive, pink growths on the surface of the skin that can be resolved using surgical removal. These kinds of tumors are called cutaneous plasmacytomas and make up approximately 86% of all plasmacytoma cases. The remaining 14% of these types of growths are classified as non-cutaneous extramedullary plasmacytomas and are found in the cells of the oral cavity (9% of the time), the GI tract (4% of the time), and in the bone marrow (less than 1% – in multiple myeloma). They are also much more aggressive, harder to diagnose, and difficult to treat, which is exactly what Dr. Nancy covers in this week’s episode.

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